Bowing the head for saints?

Does your priest bow his head when he says the name of Jesus or of Mary at Mass? Doing so is a fine, reverent tradition; like all such things, it is particularly popular amongst the most hard-working and devoted and popular priests. (Oh how the laity respond when a priest is always ready to talk after Mass, always ready to give blessings and advice and consolation etc.!)

But anyway: it is a good practice. That’s why I was interested to discover today that the General Instruction of the Roman Missal—which is so often unhelpfully vague, so that it’s hard to know best practice without knowing the older rubrics—not only mentions the bowing of heads at the aforementioned Holy Names, but prescribes it. I was even more interested to read that it prescribes the very same bowing at every mention of the name of the saint in whose honour the Mass is celebrated. This latter practice I have never seen anywhere. Perhaps it’s something to revive? Certainly I bowed my head at the name of St Charles Borromeo today, after whom I took my confirmation name!

Here’s the relevant passage (GIRM 275a):

A bow of the head is made when the three Divine Persons are named together and at the names of Jesus, of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and of the Saint in whose honour Mass is being celebrated.

We can also find the practice prescribed by the the old Roman Missal of 1962 (the Missal of the Extraordinary Form), which also tells priests to bow their heads at the Pope’s name (Ritus Servandae in Celebratione Missae chapter V no. 2):

Cum in oratione, vel alibi in Missa, pronuntiatur nomen IESU vel MARIAE, itemque cum exprimitur nomen Sancti vel Beati de quo dicitur Missa aut fit commemoratio, vel Summi Pontificis, sacerdos caput inclinat.

When in the oration, or elsewhere in the Mass, the name of JESUS or MARY is said, or the name of the Saint or Blessed for whom the Mass or commemoration is offered, or the name of the Supreme Pontiff, the priest inclines his head.

Henceforth, I shall always bow as GIRM 275a instructs, and I shall readily explain to priests and others why I am doing so. Please do join me in this!

Nihil videretur obedientia prodesse humilibus, si contemptus contumacibus non obesse

Some weeks ago I suggested that the Church’s failure to excommunicate Governor Cuomo of New York, and other practising Catholic politicians who promote abortion, made it more difficult for the faithful to uphold the Church’s teaching on the topic. Indeed, I might have put this another way: if the Rock of Truth is overgrown with weeds, it is harder to cling to it.

Well, pursuing the old-form* Pontificale Romanum (the book of rites that bishops perform), I find vindication for my view in the rite of major excommunication:

Cum ego N. talem primo, secundo, tertio, et quarto, ad malitiam convincendam, legitime monuerim, ut tale quid faciat, vel non faciat, ipse vero mandatum hujusmodi contempserit adimplere; quia nihil videretur obedientia prodesse humilibus, si contemptus contumacibus non obesset: idcirco auctoritate Dei omnipotentis Patris, et Filii, et Spiritus Sancti, et beatorum Apostolorum Petri et Pauli, et omnium Sanctorum, exigente ipsius contumacia, ipsum excommunico in his scriptis, et tamdiu ipsum vitandum denuntio, donec adimpleverit, quod mandatur; ut spiritus ejus in die judicii salvus fiat.

Which means (in suitably solemn and legalistic language):

WHEREAS I N. have now lawfully warned X. for a first, second, third and fourth time that, for the purposes of overcoming his wickedness, he should refrain from doing, or not doing, such-and-such a thing, but he has disdained to fulfil my order to that effect; and whereas obedience would appear to avail little to the humble, if the contempt of the insolent man should do him no harm: therefore, by the authority of God the Almighty, Father, and Son, and Holy Spirit, and of the Blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and of all the saints, I, being forced to action by this man’s obstinacy, do excommunicate him by this decree, and I mark him out as one to be shunned, until such time as he fulfil what I have ordered; in order that his spirit might be safe on the day of judgement.

Well quite!

*As I mentioned in a previous article, the texts of modern liturgical books are usually not available online.

Blessings blessings blessings!

The official blessings of the modern Roman Rite are set out in the Book of Blessings (Latin original: De Benedictionibus) of 1987 (second ed 1990). Unfortunately, as with most modern liturgical books, one can’t access its contents online. However, at https://sanctamissa.org/en/resources/books-1962/rituale-romanum/ , one can access the second section of the 1962 edition of the old Rituale Romanum, the ‘Benedictionale’, which is once again valid thanks to Summorum Pontificum. And pursuing its contents, one finds a rich array of blessings and devotions that have sadly been allowed to lapse. To raise awareness of them, I list them below. If you see one suited to you, ask your priest to do it! (I could be wrong, but I think that these blessings, though given in Latin, may be said in any language; after all, a priest is perfectly entitled to make up a blessing on the spot. The blessing to make holy water, and other quasi-liturgical blessings, may be exceptions to this).

As I understand it most of these blessings can in fact be found in the modern Book of Blessings, though the Rituale versions are a bit grander. To give you a flavour of the Rituale ones as listed below, here is an English translation of the central prayer of the ‘Blessing for an Automobile or other Vehicle’, with its rather nice nod to the Ethiopian of Acts 8 (courtesy of Sancta Missa):

‘Lord God, be well disposed to our prayers, and bless this vehicle with your holy hand. Appoint your holy angels as an escort over it, who will always shield its passengers and keep them safe from accidents. And as once by your deacon, Philip, you bestowed faith and grace upon the Ethiopian seated in his carriage and reading Holy Writ, so also now show the way of salvation to your servants, in order that, strengthened by your grace and ever intent upon good works, they may attain, after all the successes and failures of this life, the certain happiness of everlasting life; through Christ our Lord. All: Amen.

Blessings Available in the Roman Ritual 1962

Blessings for Special Days and Feasts of the Church Year

  • Rite for Providing Holy Water
  • The Sunday Blessing With Holy Water
  • Blessing of Wine (Two Forms)
  • Blessing of Epiphany Water (on the Eve of Epiphany)
  • Blessing of Gold, Incense, Myrrh (on Epiphany)
  • Blessing of Chalk (on Epiphany)
  • Blessing of Homes (on Epiphany)
  • Blessing of Candles (on the Feast of St Blaise)
  • Blessing of Throats (on the Feast of St Blaise)
  • Blessing of Bread, Wine, Water, Fruit for the Relief of Throat Ailments (on the Feast of St Blaise)
  • Blessing of Homes (on Holy Saturday and during Easter)
  • The Easter Blessings of Food
  • Blessing of Crosses which are to be set in vineyards, fields, etc., on or about May 3
  • Blessing of a Bonfire on the Vigil of the Birthday of St. John the Baptist
  • Blessing of Herbs on the Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
  • Blessing of Seed and Seedlings on the Birthday of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Blessings of Persons

  • Blessing of an Expectant Mother at the approach of confinement
  • Blessing of a Mother After Childbirth
  • Blessing of a Woman After Childbirth in a case where the child was stillborn or died after birth
  • Blessing of an Infant or Little Child
  • Blessing of a Child
  • Blessing of Children when on some special occasion they are assembled in church for this purpose
  • Blessing of Children on Feastdays of the Holy Childhood Association
  • Blessing of Pilgrims before they set out for the holy shrines
  • Blessing of Pilgrims on their return
  • Blessing of Sick Pilgrims
  • Blessing of a Sick Adult
  • Blessing of Sick Children

Blessings of Animals

  • Blessing of Cattle, Herds, Flocks
  • Blessing of Horses and Other Animals
  • Blessing of Sick Animals
  • Blessing of Fowl or any Kind of Bird
  • Blessing of Bees
  • Blessing of Silkworms
  • Deprecatory Blessing Against Pests

Blessings of Homes, Buildings, or Places

  • Blessing of a Cornerstone
  • Blessing of a Private or Domestic Oratory
  • Blessing of an Apartment or a Home
  • Blessing of Homes (two Versions)
  • Blessing of a Bridal Chamber
  • Blessing of a School
  • Solemn Blessing of a School
  • Blessing of a Library
  • Blessing of an Archive
  • Blessing of a Seminary
  • Blessing of a Printing-Office and Printing-Press
  • Blessing of a Hospital or Sanatorium
  • Blessing of a Radio Station
  • Blessing of the sea
  • Blessing of Fields, Mountain-Meadows or Pastures
  • Blessing of Orchards and Vineyards
  • Blessing of a Granary or the Harvest
  • Blessing of a Mill
  • Blessing of a Stable for horses, cattle, etc.
  • Blessing of a Fountain
  • Blessing of a Well
  • Blessing of a Bridge
  • Blessing of a Lime-Kiln
  • Blessing of a Blast-Furnace or of a Brick-Kiln
  • Blessing of Stone-Quarries
  • Blessing of a Marble-Factory
  • Blessing to Ward off Floods

Blessings of Places Designated for Sacred Purposes

  • Blessing and Laying the Corner-Stone of a Church*
  • Blessing of a new Church or a Public Oratory
  • Rite for Reconciling a Profaned Church
  • Rite for Blessing a new Cemetery*
  • Rite for Reconciling a Profaned Cemetery
  • Rite or Shorter Form for Consecrating a Fixed Altar which has lost its consecration if the table or mensa was separated from its support, even if only for a moment.
  • Another Rite or Shorter Form for Consecrating a Fixed Altar which has lost consecration by serious breakage or by the reliquary tomb having been broken or opened

*by the Ordinary or a Priest delegated by him

Blessings of Things Designated for Sacred Functions or Other Sacred Purposes

  • Blessing of an Antimension which by a special Apostolic indult may be used in the celebration of Mass in mission territories, in place of an altar-stone or portable altar*
  • Blessing of a Tabernacle, pyx, Ciborium for reserving the holy Eucharist
  • Blessing of a Monstrance or Ostensorium for exposition of the Blessed Sacrament
  • Blessing of a Reliquary
  • Blessing of Oil-Stocks
  • Blessing of Sacred Vessels or ornaments in general
  • Blessing of Altar-Linens
  • Blessing of a Corporal
  • Blessing of a Pall
  • Blessing of a Purificator
  • Blessing of Priestly Vestments in general
  • Blessing of any Priestly Vestment
  • Solemn Blessing of a Cross
  • More Solemn Blessing of a Cross
  • Solemn Blessing of an Image of our Lord Jesus Christ, the blessed Virgin Mary, or any saint
  • Blessing of a Clerical Cassock (a candidate for holy orders, who has obtained permission to wear the clerical cassock, may wish to have this garment blessed. The clerical aspirant, holding the cassock folded over his outstretched arms, kneels before the priest)
  • Blessing of a Cincture to be worn in honor of our Lord Jesus Christ.
  • Blessing of a Cincture to be worn in honor of the blessed Virgin Mary or a canonized saint
  • Blessing of a Habit to be worn in honor of the blessed Virgin Mary
  • Blessing of a Habit to be worn in honor of the blessed Virgin Mary or a canonized saint
  • Blessing of a Cincture to be worn in honor of St. Joseph, spouse of our Lady
  • Blessing of Lilies on the feast of St. Anthony of Padua
  • Blessing of a Processional Banner of any society
  • Blessing of Candles
  • Blessing of a Church Organ
  • Blessing of a Church Bell designated for a church that is merely blessed or for an oratory*
  • Rite for Erecting Stations of the Cross

BLESSINGS OF THINGS DESIGNATED FOR ORDINARY USE

  • Blessing of Bread and Pastries
  • Blessing of Grapes
  • Blessing of Wine for the Sick
  • Blessing of any Kind of Medicine
  • Blessing of Beer
  • Blessing of Cheese or Butter
  • Blessing of Lard
  • Blessing of Oil
  • Blessing of Salt or Oats for Animals
  • Blessing of Seed
  • Blessing of any Victual
  • Blessing of Fire
  • Blessing of Linens for the Sick
  • Blessing of a Stretcher, Ambulance, Wheelchair
  • Blessing of an Automobile or Other Vehicle
  • Blessing of an Airplane
  • Blessing of a Railway and its Cars
  • A More Solemn Blessing of a Railway and its Cars
  • Blessing of a Ship or Boat
  • Solemn Blessing of a Fishing-Boat
  • Blessing of Tools for Scaling Mountains
  • Blessing of a Seismograph
  • Blessing of a Telegraph
  • Blessing of an Electric Dynamo
  • Blessing of a Fire-Engine
  • Blessing of Molten Metal for a Bell
  • Blessing of a Bell not designated for a church or oratory
  • Blessing of Mobile Film Units for Road Safety
  • Blessing of Anything

*reserved to a Bishop but may be delegated to a Priest

Intercessions for religious freedom

Good (inspiring, confident, faithful Catholicism):

Almighty God, give us, we pray, the grace always to see the image of your son in all people, and, loving Christ, to love them too. Help us always to shine forth as witnesses of the light of Christ, so that, ever patient and gentle, we may lead all people to the fullness of faith in your holy Catholic Church.

Bad (yawn Catholicism, of the kind found in places with ugly, banal liturgy):

We pray that all religions and cultures may always be valued and respected, and that religious discrimination may come to an end, so that human rights may always be upheld.

Now, obviously I’m not against human rights, or the respecting of people’s religious convictions as such. But bland, secular imprecations like the above—-variations of which one hears in church all too often—don’t mention the reason why all should, and Catholics do, respect people’s rights (namely, God’s having created all men for a purpose, and his loving them all), nor the cause of Catholics’ typically keen awareness of the dignity of man (namely, the work of the Holy Spirit).

You will see that my fictional bad intercession also talks of ‘religious discrimination’. On this and similar subjects, too, the intercessions of ‘yawn Catholicism’ are often very unsatisfactory. For we should remember that religious discrimation (to consider only that kind of discrimation) is not always invalid: for example, Catholic schools may legitimately discern their applicants by religion. Indeed, I don’t think the Second Vatican Council precludes states from discriminating in favour of Christians in immigration policy (and I would argue that, if Britain adopts a point-based immigration system, we ought to do just that—not that we ever will of course!).

Nor is this a merely academic point. It is because of wishy-washy incautious indifferentism like the above that so much of the liturgy of ‘yawn Catholicism’ sounds so boring and uninspiring to most Catholics. Most of us are probably afraid to admit just how dull it can be, for fear of being accused of being reactionary, anti-Vat-II types; but in fact we (mostly) aren’t, and we really should be more honest about the meagre liturgical fare that is so often served to us. Better that than simply lapsing, as so many do. Indeed, we should refute people who try to smear us for demanding more faithful prayers.